John Townsend Trowbridge

Born: Sept. 18, 1827, Ogden, Monroe Co., New York
Died: 1916, unknown
Parents: Windsor Stone Trowbridge & Rebecca Willey
Occupation: writer & poet
First Marriage: May 9, 1860, Lowell, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts
Buried: Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett, Massachusetts
First Wife: Cornelia Warren
Born: May 1, 1834, Hanover, Plymouth Co., Massachusetts
Died: Mar. 23, 1864, Lowell, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts
Buried: Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett, Massachusetts
Second Marriage: after 1864, probably Massachusetts
Second Wife: Mrs. Trowbridge (name unknown)
Born: unknown
Died: unknown
Buried: Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett, Massachusetts

Children:

(John Townsend Trowbridge & Cornelia Warren)


Alice Trowbridge

Born: Mar. 29, 1861, Somerville, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
Died: 1861, Somerville, Suffolk, Massachusetts
Buried: Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett, Massachusetts

Windsor Warren Trowbridge
Born: Feb. 11, 1864, Somerville, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
Died: May 19, 1884, Somerville, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
Buried: Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett, Massachusetts

(John Townsend Trowbridge & unknown)


Arthur Trowbridge

Born: unknown
Died: unknown
Buried: Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, Arlington, Massachusetts
Marriage: unknown
Wife: Mrs. Trowbridge (name unknown)
Born: unknown
Died: unknown
Buried: Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, Arlington, Massachusetts

 




John Townsend Trowbridge

JOHN TOWNSEND TROWBRIDGE
"He was educated in the common schools, learned the elements of Latin, Greek, and French without a master, and, after teaching and working on a farm for one year in Illinois, settled in New York city, where he wrote for the journals and magazines.  He removed to Boston about 1848, and in 1850, during the absence of Ben. Perley Poore in Washington, D. C., edited his paper, the "Sentinel," but wrote for it an editorial on the fugitive-slave law that nearly destroyed the popularity of the paper.  He has since been connected with many magazines and newspapers, has led an active literary life, and was managing editor of "Our Young Folks" in 1870-'3.  He was one of the original contributors to the "Atlantic Monthly" ; and the "Vagabonds," "At Sea," and the "Pewee" among his poems, and the popular short story "Coupon-Bonds," appeared in that magazine.  John Burroughs says of him: "He knows the heart of a boy and the heart of a man, and has laid them both open in his books.  His' Neighbor Jackwood' is the pioneer of novels of real life in New England, and the 'Vagabonds' is the first specimen, and one of the best, of what has come to be known as the Bret Harte school of poetry." Mr. Trowbridge has published numerous books of adventure, travel, and fiction, and his writings include " Father Brighthopes, or an Old Clergyman's Vacation" (Boston, 1853) ; "Burrcliff" (1853) ; "Hearts and Faces" (1853) ; " Home Life Unveiled" (1853) ; "Martin Merrivale, his X-Mark" (1854) ; "Ironthorpe" (1855) ;"Neighbor Jackwood, a Novel of New England Life" (1857) ; "The Old Battle-Ground" (1859); " The Vagabonds, and other Poems" (1869) : "The Drummer-Boy" (1863) ; "Cudjo's Cave" (1864) ; "The Three Scouts" (1865) ; "Lucy Arlyn" (1866) ; "The South, a Tour of its Battle-Fields and Ruined Cities" (Hartford, 1866) ; "Neighbors' Wives" (Boston, 1867) ; "The Story of Columbus" (1867); "Coupon Bonds, and other Stories" (1871); "The Jack Hazard Series" (5 vols., 1871-'5); "The Emigrant's Story, and other Poems" (18'75) ; "The Silver Medal Series" (6 vols., 1877-'82); "The Book of Gold, and other Poems" (New York, 1878);" A Home Idyl, and other Poems" (1881) ; and "The Tide-Mill Series" (6 vols., Boston, 1882-'7)."

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