Company B,
27th N.J. Volunteers
Union Army
American Civil War

David Austin Trowbridge
Born: Feb. 21, 1828, Mt. Freedom, Randolph, Morris Co., New Jersey
Died: July 4, 1899, Boonton Township, Morris Co., New Jersey
Parents: David Trowbridge & Anna Youngs
Baptism: Sept 24 1848, First Methodist Church, Dover, Morris Co., New Jersey
Occupations: Carpenter, Farmer
Military Service: Corp., B2, Rect., 27th New Jersey Volunteers, American Civil War
Religious Affiliation: Mt. Freedom Presbyterian Church, Mt. Freedom, Randolph, Morris Co., New Jersey
Buried: Mt. Freedom Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Mt. Freedom, Randolph, Morris Co., New Jersey
Residences: (1850-1887) either 600 Millbrook Avenue, Mt. Freedom, Randolph, Morris Co., New Jersey; 90 Speedwell Avenue, Morristown, Morris Co., New Jersey (1890 & 1891 Morristown Directories)
Marriage: Feb. 21, 1850, Mt. Freedom Presbyterian Church,
Mt. Freedom, Randolph, Morris Co., New Jersey
Wife: Catherine Caroline Coe
Born: Oct. 21, 1832, Mt. Freedom, Randolph, Morris Co., New Jersey
Died: Feb. 14, 1898, Littleton (Parsippany), Morris Co., New Jersey
Buried: Mt. Freedom Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Mt. Freedom, Randolph, Morris Co., New Jersey
Parents: Peter Coe & Rhoda Ann Drake
Sibling: Maletta Coe



Children:

Armino Gertrude Trowbridge

Charles Austin Trowbridge

Rhoda Ann Trowbridge

William Francis Trowbridge

Maletta Trowbridge

Laura Ella Trowbridge

Bryant Coe Trowbridge

Sarah Jane Trowbridge

George Whitfield Trowbridge

Emma Frances Trowbridge

David Jarrard Trowbridge




                                                 David Austin Trowbridge                  Catherine Caroline Coe

David Austin Trowbridge (left) and his wife Catherine Caroline Coe (right).

DAVID AUSTIN TROWBRIDGE & CATHERINE CAROLINE COE

David Austin Trowbridge's middle name was probably after the names of his great uncle, Augustine Bayles Trowbridge, whose nickname was Austin, or his paternal uncle Augustine Trowbridge, who lived in New Providence, Union Co., New Jersey. David Austin served in the Union Army during the Civil War, serving for nine months. He enlisted on September 3, 1862, in Company B, 27th New Jersey Infantry, and was mustered out on July 2, 1863. According to baptismal records from Dover, Morris Co., New Jersey, he was baptized as an adult on September 24, 1848, by Rev. J. P. Fort. He served as a sexton at the Mt. Freedom First Presbyterian Church in Mt. Freedom, Randolph Township, Morris Co., New Jersey for several years (a sexton is a church officer who takes care of the church grounds, rings the church bells, and performs odd jobs around the facilities, such as digging graves, etc.). According to property maps of Randolph dating from 1868, his farm was located on the top of Millbrook Avenue near Sussex Turnpike, in Mt. Freedom (Mt. Freedom is the name of a area of Randolph Township on Trowbridge Mountain) next to a house that may have been the home of his mother, Anna Youngs Trowbridge, who was widowed by that time. His house may have been one listed in a 1984 Randolph survey of old homes as Trowbridge House at 630 Millbrook Avenue, or _the Trowbridge-Drake-Pool house next door at 631 Millbrook Ave. According to the survey, both houses dated back as early as 1853, and were owned by the Trowbridge family (although Francis Bacon Trowbridge says the elder David Trowbridge built his house in 1819). This historical survey was in error when it stated the brick portion of the house was the oldest part of the building, but according to a brochure for the new home of the Randolph Museum, which opened at e Brundage House on Sept. 10, 2 005, the front gable was built by David Austin. It would make sense, since David Austin and his father were carpenters and not masons. The house that David Austin's mother spent her last years, and the barn were torn down when Randolph built Freedom Park on the old Brundage estate in 2000.

David Trowbridge, probably because of ill health and unable to pay his mortgage, sold his farm to his eldest son, Charles Austin Trowbridge in 1887 for $1,000, and Charles, by purchasing the farm, assumned the mortgage, which was about $600. David Austin moved to Morristown, where he continued to work as a carpenter. David, Catherine, and their youngest children would continue to live in Morristown on 90 Speedwell Ave. well into the 1890s. His younger children continued to live in the Morristown area well after David Austin and Catherine died, especially the families of his youngest s sons David Jarrard and Bryant Trowbridge. Both families lived up the road in the Morris Plains area, well into the 1980s. time. Also, some, if not all the children were illiterate. Even though David Austin was literate (see above signature), his son William Francis and his wife Anna Mae Southard (ironically her father was a school teacher), were illiterate, (they answered a question in the 1930 Federal census that they were illiterate and marked legal documents with an "x". It seems to indicate some kind of dysfunction in the family leaving many members of the family even more inpoverished than other families at that time in rural Morris County. Also David Austin and his family were very poor money managers. Charles austin defaulted on the mortgage in the mid 1890s, and was force to sell the farm to the Cutler family, notorious land speculators who specialized in foreclosing on mortgages for pennies on the dollar, and reselling for a good profit. The Cutlers were precursors of the real estate speculators who made their fortunes in Morris County during the real estate boom of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. When David Austin and his wife died, Francis Bacon Trowbridge had them listed as having died in Littleton, which is now Parsippany, although the Morristown City Directory from 1895-98 has them still living in Morristown, along with their youngest son David Jarrard, who was still living in the same residence by himself in 1899. F. B. Trowbridge lists David Austin as dying in Littleton, New Jersey, but a local newspaper in his death notice says he died in Boonton Township, about five miles north of Morristown. It is unknown why he was there, although it was not at the poor farm, which was located near Littleton at the present day Jersey City resevoir along present day state highway 46 in Parsippany Township near Littleton Road. David Austin's death notice lists him  as dying in Boonton, which could have been at Riverside Hospital.  What he was doing in Boonton is unknown



The Brundage House is the home of the Randolph Museum, which opened on Sept. 11, 2005. The following is from the Randolph Historical Society brochure posted on the society's webpage regarding the history of the property:


the parcel of property which the Brundage House sits today was part of a much larger tract purchased in the 1700’s by David Trowbridge, whose family originally emigrated from England and eventually settled in Morris County. The Trowbridge name is well known in Morris County. The property was extensive, continuing down the other side of the mountain covering most of Shongum on down to the other side of the mountain to what is now the 9/11 memorial on West Hanover Avenue. Eventually portions of the property began to be sold off and acreage upon which the farmhouse is located became the focal point for both the Trowbridges and subsequent owners, the Brundages. While David Trowbridge most likely built some kind of dwelling on the property, it no longer exists.  The portion of the existing farmhouse (gable front and wing) is thought to have been built in the late 1860’s by D. A. Trowbridge (David Austin), a great-great grandson of the original property owner. The property has a history of being farmed by many generations of the Trowbridges. Gardens, orchards and fields dotted the landscape up until 2000, when the property became a township recreational facility. Records indicate that many children were born in the house, and often with large families numbering as large as 14. It is believed that the property stayed within the extended Trowbridge family, often having been or sold back and forth to, or inherited by, in-laws, relatives, and descendents.

The family for whom the house is now named bought the property in the early 1920’s. Charles Brundage, a Dartmouth College Carnegie Institute graduate, was an investment banker with a sense of civic responsibility. In 1932, he founded the investment firm of Brundage, Story, and Rose in New York City. He served on trustee boards both locally and in New York, and initiated the first zoning regulations in Randolph during his tenure on the newly formed Planning Board. His most notable contributions to his community came in the form of donations of land for use as parks – James Andrews Park and Brundage Park - and he was a trustee of the Charles E. & Edna Brundage Charitable Scientific and Wild Life Conservation Foundation. The Brundage’s daughter and her husband were the last tenants before the house and the surrounding 172 acres were sold to the township.

The house is a two~story~gable~front~and~wing, common in the rural northeast at the time that it was built. The proliferation of railroads allowed much change in construction techniques for folk dwellings. The abundance of timber also made it easier and less expensive to add on to existing structures. Several buildings, no longer existing, as well as other houses, were on the property at various times, including the barn pictured above. A white picket fence once surrounded the house, and the front entrance appears to be on the north side of the house, rather than on the street side. It is not known when the brick portion of the house was built."
 

 

Above pictures courtesy of the Randolph Historical Society.

 

This portion of the house was built in the 1920s or later.





Middle and bottom photos ae of the original section of the house built by David Austin Trowbridge during the 1860s. The house sits on Freedom Park in Randolph, New Jersey, and is now the home of the Randolph Museum, operated by the Randolph Historical Society, It is open on Sundays between 2-4pm.

 

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DEED BETWEEN DAVID TROWBRIDGE & CATHERINE C. TROWBRIDGE

47 PAGE 462

This indenture made in the twentieth day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand-eight hundred and fifty-nine between David Trobrige of the Township of Randolph in the County of Morris and the State of New Jersey of the first part-and Catherine C. Trowbridge of the same place afound of the second part-Witnesseth that the said party of the first part for the sum of twenty five-dollars good and lawful money of the United States of America to being on hand will and truly be paid by the said party of the second part at and before the sealing and and delivery of their payments the receipt is hereby acknowledged and the said party of the first part therewith fully satified contented and paid have given, granted abound unless and bargained sold should released enfeoff conveyed and confirm to by these presents the said party of the second part and assigns forever a parcel of land and premises hereinafter particulary described situate lying and being in the Township of Randolph in the County of Morris and State of New Jersey.

Beginning at a heap of stones it being the first corner of a lot David Trowbridge purchased of Aaron Meeker and Joanna his wife and in Christopher Youngs lives, thence (1) North sixty five degrees West three chains and thirty five links; (2) North twenty six degrees east one chain and fifty links to a stone heap (3) South sixty-five degrees East three chains and thirty five links to the second corner of the lot that said Trowbridge purchased of said Meeker and wife (4) South Twenty six degrees west one chain and sixty links to the place of Beginning being half an acre be the same more or less with all and singular the houses buildings his ways waters profits-priviledges and advantages with the aformentioned to the same belonging or anywise affirming also the inate rights with property xxx and demand whatsover of the said party of the first part of in and by the same of im and to any part and parcil thereof. To have and to hold xxxx the above described half an lot of land and premises with the apportunes unto the said party of the second part her his and afregin to the only proper were benefit and behoof of the said party of the sccond part his heres and of signs form and the said David Trowbridge doth for him self his heirs executors and administrators ammend and grant to and with the said party of the second half his been and affirms that he the said party of David Trowbridge is the lawful and right owner of all and relinquishes it's above described land and premises and of any part and parcil thereof

U7 Page 464

aforesaid and also that the said David Trowbridge and his heirs executors and administrators will Warrant-License and forever defend the said land and premises unto the said Catherine C. Trowbridge and her him and fawn against the lawful claim and demands of all any from and xxxx freely and clearly freed and discharged of and forever all manner of encumbrances whatsover

Signed Sealed and Delivered
in the presence of
Silas G Leland
State of New Jersey
Morris County
David Trowbridge xhis markX
Be it remembered that in this twentiesh day of April A.D. eighteen hundred and fifty nine before me Silas Leland came of the commission for taking the acknowledgement and proofs of abode for said County of Morris personnally affirmed David Trowbridge who I am satisfied is the grantor mentioned in the foregoing deed to whom I first made mention the contents thereof and be acknowledged that he signed sealeed and delivered the same as his voluntary act-and sure for the uses and purposes therein is xxxx
Silas E. Leland
Recorded and filed March 26th 1870


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DEED BETWEEN CATHERINE C. & DAVID A. TROWBRIDGE AND THEIR SON CHARLES A. TROWBRIDGE

12, PAGE 385

Catherine C. Trowbridge & Hus[band]
to
Charles A. Trowbridge

This indenture made the sixteenth day of Jan. in the year of Our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Eighty-eight Between Catherine C. Trowbridge wife of David A. Trowbridge and the said David A. Trowbridge of the Township of Randolph in the county of Morris and the State of New Jersey of the First Part. And Charles A. Trowbridge of this Township of Morris and State of New Jersey of the Second part.

Witnesseth That the said party of the first part for and in consideration of One thousand dollars lawful money of the United States of America to them in hand well and truly paid by the said party of the second part at or before the sealing and delivery of these presents the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, and the said party of the first part therewith fully satitisfied, contented and paid haven given granted bargained sold aliened released enfeoffed conveyed and confirmed and by these presents do give grants bargain enfo off convey and confirm to the said party of the second part, and to his heirs and assign forever see that tract or parcels of land and premises herein after particularly described situate lying and being in the Township of Randolph in the County of Morris and State of New Jersey. Puttave and bounded as follows:

Beginning at a heap of stones it being the first corner of a lot David Trowbridge purchased of Aaron Meeker and Joanna his wife and in Christopher Youngs lives, thence (1) North sixty five degrees West three chains and thirty five links; (2) North twenty six degrees east one chain and fifty links to a stone heap (3) South sixty-five degrees East three chains and thirty five links to the second corner of the lot that said Trowbridge pruchased of said Meeker and wife (4) South Twenty six degrees west one chain and

I 12 PAGE 386

sixty links to the place of Beginning containing one half acre more or here Being the same premises conveyed by David Trowbridge to the said Catherine C. Trowbridge by deed dated April 20th 1859 and recorded in the Morris County Clerks office in Book M of deeds page 462 & from which this description is taken. This conveyance is made subject to two mortgages one of which was made by the parties of the first part here to Mary J. Dell for $100 dated 16th July 1870 & recorded in Book 82 of mortgages page 301 & c. The other was made by said parties of the first part hereto John J. Schmidt for $571 dated Jan 13th 1888 and not yet recorded the payments of both of which mortgages the party of the second part has to assume & agrees to pay.

Together with all and singular the houses buildings trees ways water profits privileges and advantages, anywise appertaining. Also all the estate rights title interest property claim and demand whatsoever of the said party of the first part, of, in and to the same, and of in and to every part and parcel thereof, To Have and to Hold all and singular the above described land and premises with the appurtenances unto the said party of the second part his heirs and assigns to the only proper use benefits and be hoof of the said party of the second part his heirs and assigns forever and the said Parties of the first part do for themselves their heirs, executors and administrators-covenant and grant to and with the said party of the second part his heirs and assigns that they the said parties of the first part are the true lawful and right owners of all and singular the above described lands and premises and of every part and parcel thereof with the appurtenances there unto belonging; and that the said land and premises or any part thereof, at the time of the sealing and delivery of these presents are not encumbered by any mortgage except as above mentioned judgments or limitation or by any encumberance whatsover, by which the title of the said party of the second part hereby made or intended to be made for the above described land and premises can or may be

I12, PAGE 387

changed, charged, or altered or defeated in any what whatsoever And also that the said party in the first part now have good right full power and lawful authority to grant bargain sell and convey the said land and premises in manner aforesaid. And, also, that the said Catherine C. Trowbridge and David A. Trowbridge will Warrant, secure and forever defend the said land and premises unto the said Charles A. Trowbridge his heirs and assigns forever against the lawful claims and demands of all and every person or person freely and clearly freed and discharged of and from all manner of encumbrances whatsoever.

In Witness Whereof the said party of the first part have here unto set their hands and seals the day and year first above written.

Signed Sealed and Delivered in the presence of Willard W. Butler

Catherine C. Trowbridge x her mark x
David A. Trowbridge x his mark x

State of New Jersey
County of Morris

Be it Remembered That on this eighteenth day of Jan. in the year of Our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Eighty-eight before me Willard W. Butler a Master in Chancery of N.J. personally appeared Catherine C. Trowbridge & David A. Trowbridge who I am satisfied are the grantors in the written Deed of Conveyance named- and I having first made known to them the contents thereof they did acknowledge that they signed, sealed and delivered the same-as their voluntary act and deed for the uses and purposes therein expressed.

And the said Catherine C. wife of David A. being by me privately examined separate and apart from her husband did further acknowledge the she signed sealed and delivered the same as her voluntary act and deed Freely with out any fear threats or compulsion of her said husband.

Willard W. Butler
M. L. L. of N.J.
Received and Recorded May 23. 1888
Melvin S. Condit clerk


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"THE TROWBRIDGE GENEALOGY, THE HISTORY OF THE TROWBRIDGE FAMILY IN AMERICA"

Compiled by Francis Bacon Trowbridge (New Haven, Ct.; Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, 1908) 

689. DAVID AUSTIN TROWBRIDGE (David 367, Jabaz 199, Shubael 137, David 114, Joseph 105, William 100, Thomas 1)
born February 21, 1828, in Mt. Freedom, N.J.; died July 4, 1899, in Parsippany, N. J.; married February 21, 1850, in
Mt. Freedom, Catherine Caroline Coe, daughter of Peter and Rhoda Ann (Drake) Coe, born October 24, 1832, in Mt. Freedom; died February 14, 1898,
in Littleton, N. J.  David A. Trowbridge was a carpenter by trade. He was for many years the sexton of the First Presbyterian Church of Mt. Freedom, N. J., of which he
and his wife were both members.  He was a soldier in the Civil War. He enlisted for nine months and was enrolled September 3, 1862, in Company B, 27th New Jersey Infantry,
and was mustered out July 2, 1863.

CHILDREN BORN IN MT. FREEDOM, N. J.:

i. ARMINA GERTRUDE, b. Dec. 26, 1850; m. Dec. 13, 1868, John Lloyd and resides in Kearney, N. J.
923. ii. CHARLES AUSTIN, b. June 30, 1852.
iii. RHODA ANN, b. Sept. 3, 1854; m.. 1st, Apr. 20, 1872, Jeremiah Wiggins; m., 2d, May 27, 1877, Jesse Lake of Washington, N. J.
923a. iv. WILLIAM FRANCIS, b. July 6, 1856.
v. MALITTA, b. Oct. 13, 1858; m. June 27, 1882, Walter V. Mesler and resides in Morristown, N. J.
vi. LAURA ELLA, h. Nov. 17, 1860; I11. Nov. 17, 1885, Joseph Matthew Moody and resides in Morristown. 
923b. vii. BRYANT, b. June 29. 1863.
vm. SARAH JANE, b. Feb. 4, 1806: m. Feb. 16. 1888, Abram Sanford Snyder and resides in New Vernon (Millington P.O.), N. J.
923c. ix. GEORGE WHITFIELD, b. Dec. 14. 1868.
x. EMMA FRANCES, b. Mar. 25, 1871; m. Nov. 19, 1893. Walter Scott Mingus and resides in Morris Plains, N. J.
928d. xi. DAVID JARRARD, b. July 11, 1875.

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The Mt. Freedom Presbyterian Church in Randolph, New Jersey
where David A. Trowbridge served as a sexton for several years.



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UNION NEW JERSEY VOLUNTEERS 27th REGIMENT, NEW JERSEY INFANTRY

 From the National Parks Service Web Site, Soldiers: Names and Records of Union Confederate Troops:


Organized at Camp Frelinghuysen, Newark, N. J., and mustered in September 3, 1862. Left State for Washington, D. C., October 9, 1862. At East Capital Hill till October 29 and near Alexandria, Va., till December 1. Attached to 2nd Brigade, Casey's Division, Defenses of Washington, D. C., to December, 1862.2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 9th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1863, and Army of the Ohio, to June, 1863.

SERVICE - Moved to Fredericksburg December 1-10. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Mud March Jan. 20-24, 1863. Moved to Newport News, Va., Feb. 11-13, thence to Suffolk, Va., March 18, and to Lexington and Nicholasville, Ky., March 19-28. Operations against Pegram's forces till May. Expedition to Monticello April 25-May 8. Monticello May 1. Camp near Somerset till June 3. Moved to Hickman's Bridge, thence to Cincinnati, Ohio, June 15. Volunteered services in Pennsylvania during Lee's invasion of that state, after term had expired. On duty at Wheeling, W. Va., and at Pittsburg, Pa., and vicinity till June 26. Moved to Harrisburg, Pa., June 26, thence to New Jersey and mustered out July 2, 1863.

 Regiment lost during service
1 Officer and 93 Enlisted man by disease.
Total 94.  


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REGIMENTAL HISTORY OF THE NEW JERSEY 27TH INFANTRY (9 MONTHS)

Twenty-seventh Infantry. Col., George W. Mindil Lieut. Col., Edwin S. Babcock Majs., Augustus D. Blanchet, Henry F. Willis.

This regiment, raised from the quotas of Morris and Sussex counties and rendesvoused at Camp Frelinghuysen, near Newark, was mustered into the U. S. service for nine months, on Sept. 3, 1862. It consisted of eleven companies, largely composed of representatives of the agricultural districts, and officers and men alike, in physical strength and robust capacities of endurance were equal to any in the service. The total strength of the regiment when fully organized was originally 1,088 officers and men. Having been supplied with arms, equipments and clothing, the regiment, about Oct. 3, received orders to prepare for the field. Up to that time no colonel had been selected, it being impossible for the officers to choose from the numerous applicants for the position. Finally, Capt. George W. Mindil, who had already attained distinction in the field, was, upon the strength of testimonials and representations from gentlemen who knew his eminent capabilities for command, elected to the post, and on the afternoon of the 9th, the regiment left Newark for Washington, where it arrived on the morning of the 11th, being assigned a temporary camp on East Capitol hill. On the evening of Dec. 10, after a march of much hardship, the regiment reported for duty within the Federal lines, and was at once assigned to the 2nd brigade, 1st division, 9th army corps-the division being under the temporary command of Brig.-Gen. W. W. Burns, and the corps under Brig.-Gen. O. B. Wilcox. Although the regiment was not brought into close and actual conflict during its term of service, it was sufficiently exposed at the battle of Fredericksburg to test the bravery and trustworthiness of the officers and men, and the rapidity with which they advanced when ordered forward to the assistance of their comrades showed the mettle of which they were made. The regiment afterward joined Burnside's forces in Kentucky and later moved into Pennsylvania at the time of Lee's invasion. It remained in the field until long after its term had expired and was mustered out on July 2, 1863.

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David A. Trowbridge's Civil War marker. (Above picture from findagrave.com).




The headstones of David Austin Trowbridge, and his wife Catherine C. Coe.


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